Image from Bloomberg.com

If you live in a port city, chances are you’ve seen quite the increase in activity over the past few years.  Drastic port expansions and dramatic increases in truck traffic are happening all over the U.S. which has raised a lot of concerns among residents, regarding air quality and traffic safety.  And without missing a step, many community residents got organized and ready to fight for their right to clean air and healthy communities.

Image from NRDC

The Moving Forward Network emerged as a great resource for community members living on the fenceline of numerous multi-million dollar port expansions.  Through the Network, residents can connect with other communities, living hundreds of miles away, to discuss what worked and what didn’t.  Often times communities can share tools, like air monitors, to document the problem and everyone can stand in solidarity for each other.  It’s a great idea and it works!

Here’s the thing though: while the Moving Forward Network is connecting to port communities within the United States, the increase in ports and goods movement affects communities all over the globe.

A similar international network has not yet formed.

Meanwhile, communities in isolation are doing their best to respond to this growing international crisis.

Image from IDEX

Desmond D’Sa, this year’s Goldman Prize winner from Africa, has led rigorous campaigns in South Durban, South Africa for his community’s right to breathe clean air.  Currently, Desmond and the South Durban Community Environmental Alliance (SDECA) are fighting a $10 billion port expansion.  This port expansion stands to displace thousands of people without compensation and exacerbate problems such as waste management, pollution, and traffic.

You can help Desmond by signing the petition against the port expansion here.

Similarly, fishing communities on Goat Islands in Jamaica are also fighting for their livelihood.  Plans are underway to build a large port in their rural fishing village.

Image from Go Jamaica

This area, because of its coral reefs and mangroves, has been declared a protected area under the Natural Resources Conservation Authority Act (NRCA), and two fish sanctuaries have been declared under the Fisheries Industry Act to protect the fish nursery there.  These would be destroyed forever by the proposed port construction.  In addition thousands of fishermen would no longer be able to support themselves and their families.

Sign their petition here.

Building on the work of the US-based Moving Forward Network, we need to stand in solidarity with port communities throughout the world.  We need to share resources and information on the same level that 21st century goods are moved: on a global level (and we need the leadership of funders to facilitate this international movement building).

The Global Anti-Incinerator Alliance (GAIA) and the Basel Action Network (BAN) are great examples of networks that are working with communities addressing issues within countries and across international borders.  Recognizing the global trade economy, both work towards sustainable waste solutions within the international community.

Let’s use that energy and momentum for an international network for sustainable ports and minimizing the impacts of the global movement of goods.

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