Image from dnainfo.com

This community is on the frontlines of a huge Environmental Justice battle and we’ve armed them with Buckets!

Last week GCM traveled to Chicago to launch a brand new Bucket Brigade, in collaboration with Environmental Law and Policy Center and Sustainable Englewood, to monitor diesel emissions in Chicago’s Englewood neighborhood.

Englewood is no stranger to Environmental Injustice.  When residents found out Norfolk Southern was planning on nearly doubling the size of its rail yard, expanding it by 85 acres, they knew it was time, yet again, to get organized.

Exposure to diesel exhaust can have immediate health effects. Diesel exhaust can irritate the eyes, nose, throat and lungs, and it can cause coughs, headaches, lightheadedness and nausea. In studies with human volunteers, diesel exhaust particles made people with allergies more susceptible to the materials to which they are allergic, such as dust and pollen. Exposure to diesel exhaust also causes inflammation in the lungs, which may aggravate chronic respiratory symptoms and increase the frequency or intensity of asthma attacks.

So, what does the community want?  A fair deal for Englewood residents!  This community is tired of being dumped on by Norfolk Southern and the city of Chicago.

On September 12, 2013 Englewood residents met with staff members of ELPC and GCM to lead a tour of the community.  This neighborhood was hit hard by the recession. When home prices dropped, the rail company, Norfolk Southern, began buying up properties and bulldozing the historic homes.  It was only after Norfolk Southern was exposed for this apparent landgrab, that they came clean with the community residents that they had in fact already been in discussion with the City on the expansion.   

That landgrab left the community virtually barren.

Many families were pressured to leave their homes.  Schools closed and homes were bulldozed.  The parks once filled with children’s laughter are

now overgrown and covered in diesel soot.  A once vibrant community is gone, except for the handful of residents refusing to leave the only place they know as home.

The residents showed us the schools, the library, parks and the rail yard.  We watched as work crews finished up the

While the community has accepted the rail yard expansion, they simply want to ensure their quality of life and a safe place for them to live.demolition of a home well over 100 years old and we were detoured around road crews upgrading railroads.  

The next day, over a dozen people came out to attend the training on how to collect their own air samples and use them as an organizing tool.  They wanted to know how and when to operate the equipment, how they can be the most effective and what they can get out of it.

GCM shared success stories from other communities and outlined the Bucket Brigade project.  The ELPC helped the community map out their community and identify ‘hot spots’ to place the monitor. 

Then each community member had a chance to practice setting out the monitoring and programming it to run for 24 hours.  Afterwards we all went over quality control and quality assurance as well as the final paperwork for documenting weather conditions and shipping the samples.  We all went back into the neighborhood to retrieve the sample set out the previous day.

Now Airhugger readers, you better pay close attention here, because this is a hot project.  We’ve decided on an aggressive two month sampling plan to get all the data in on time.  We need to make sure Englewood gets a fair deal from Norfolk Southern and you can stay up to date on this project at gcmonitor.org

 

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