GCM’s Letter to the Consumer Product Safety Commission

Read a letter from GCM to the CSPC highlighting the comments of the public about the problems with Lumber Liquidators laminate flooring.

Fortune: Lumber Liquidators CEO quits amid federal probe into flooring safety, lawsuits

From Fortune The discount hardwood floor retailer found itself in even more turmoil as its CEO abruptly resigned amid a federal probe into product safety and dozens of lawsuits. Lumber Liquidators Holdings LL -16.50% Chief Executive Bob Lynch has abruptly resigned, creating even more turmoil at the discount hardwood flooring retailer as it faces a Continue Reading »

NY Times: Lumber Liquidators CEO unexpectedly quits

From the New York Times Lumber Liquidators, under scrutiny for months as it faces accusations that it sold products with dangerous levels of formaldehyde, said Thursday that its chief executive had left the company. The chief executive and president, Robert M. Lynch, resigned “unexpectedly,” the company said. Thomas D. Sullivan, the company’s founder, will serve Continue Reading »

CBS News: Lumber Liquidators CEO unexpectedly quits

From CBS News Lumber Liquidators (LL) said Thursday that CEO Robert Lynch is stepping down. Lynch’s surprise exit from the flooring retailer follows a plunge in the company’s financial performance triggered by a March report by CBS news show “60 Minutes” that found some of the Chinese-made laminate flooring sold at its store violated health Continue Reading »

Lumber Liquidators’ insurers want out amid scandal

Lumber Liquidators’ fight against claims its China-sourced laminate flooring contained unsafe levels of formaldehyde could get a lot tougher. Many of the retailer’s product liability insurance carriers are refusing to defend the company in class-action suits brought by unhappy customers — forcing the company to file suit against the insurers, court papers filed in a Continue Reading »

Feds open criminal probe of Lumber Liquidators

The floor gave way under Lumber Liquidators on Wednesday. The troubled hardwood flooring retailer, in a blizzard of bad news, revealed the feds have launched a criminal probe into its China-sourced laminate flooring; reported that first-quarter results swung to a loss from a profit last year; and announced that Chief Financial Officer Daniel Terrell is Continue Reading »

Get the complete and most up to date list on our website.

From our partners at Care2.

Lumber Liquidators, one of the largest flooring retailers in the U.S., appears to be selling laminate that contains unacceptable levels of formaldehyde. The levels are so high, pediatricians worry that children who breathe in air contaminated by formaldehyde emissions could develop asthma or other respiratory ailments.

Global Community Monitor, a non-profit organization that helps citizens monitor air pollution in the U.S. and around the world, has launched a petition on Care2 to get Lumber Liquidators to stop selling unsafe laminate, recall what it has already sold, and replace the toxic laminate with a safe and healthy alternative. You can get the full details of the petition here.

What is Formaldehyde and Why Should You Care?

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, formaldehyde is a colorless, reactive, strong-smelling gas at room temperature. A volatile organic compound (VOC), formaldehyde is an industrial chemical that is used in home furnishings, household cleaners, pesticides, paints and flooring, like the laminate being sold by Lumber Liquidators.

The CDC says formaldehyde is dangerous because exposure to it can cause a variety of adverse health effects, including eye, nose, throat and skin irritation, coughing, wheezing, and allergic reactions. “Long-term exposure to high levels of formaldehyde has been associated with cancer in people and lab animals,” says the CDC here.

Why is Formaldehyde in Lumber Liquidators Laminate a Problem?

Global Community Monitor had a large sample of the laminates Lumber Liquidators produces in China tested for formaldehyde emissions.  Amazingly, the results showed that some laminated flooring contains almost 20 times more than what is legally allowed to be sold. “The test labs thought the machine (used to test for formaldehyde) was broken,” Denny Larson, the group’s CEO, told 60 Minutes when they investigated the story.

In that 60 Minutes report, Dr. Philip Landrigan, a pediatrician who specializes in environmental pollution at Mt. Sinai Hospital in New York, told reporter Anderson Cooper, “It’s not a safe level. It’s at a level that the U.S. EPA calls polluted indoor conditions.”

Asked “Would you want that in your home?” Dr. Landrigan answered an emphatic “No!”

Lumber Liquidators has challenged the recent negative press, saying the tests used to gauge the formaldehyde levels are unfair. The tests (designed by the California Air Resources Board, or CARB) rip apart the laminate in the flooring, which helps seal-in the formaldehyde, according to Liquid Lumbers.

That may help a little, but the formaldehyde still poses a risk, says environmental attorney Richard Drury to NPR. “This piece of plastic that’s on top of the board is not an emissions control device, it’s a piece of plastic.”

Dr. Landrigan explained that it might not produce symptoms in everybody, but children are the most vulnerable and likely to show symptoms.

“It would be risky because it increases the risk of chronic respiratory irritations, change in a person’s lung function, and increased risk of asthma.”

Global Community Monitor is directing its petition at Tom Sullivan, CEO and Founder of Lumber Liquidators. It is asking Sullivan to “take action today to stop selling any unsafe Chinese laminate.” It also urges the company to “pay to remove and replace the flooring for those who unsuspectingly bought their products containing this toxic chemical.”

You can get more information and sign the petition here.

Read more: http://www.care2.com/greenliving/tell-lumber-liquidators-to-stop-selling-toxic-flooring.html#ixzz3UfIDNPFL

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: March 12, 2015 CONTACTS: Denny Larson, GCM, 415-845-4705; Richard Drury, Esq., Lozeau Drury LLP, 510-836-4200

Today, Lumber Liquidators acknowledged that the California Air Resources Board (CARB) has tested Lumber Liquidators’ products and preliminary results show that some of the products exceed the CARB formaldehyde standard. The admission was made by the company’s CEO, Robert Lynch during a conference call. Lumber Liquidators also announced, for the first time, that it is offering free formaldehyde tests and potentially the replacement of floors which may be found to exceed acceptable levels of formaldehyde.

The transcript from today’s briefing states: “CARB has ‘deconstructed’ our products in routine inspections, as well as we believe others in the industry, in order to try to determine if the core materials complied. In CARB’s preliminary findings, some of our samples they deconstructed and tested (due to the variability of the test) exceeded the limits for raw cores.”

“CARB testing is the standard to which Lumber Liquidators’ laminate products must be held,” said Denny Larson, Executive Director of GCM. “They admitted today that CARB has made a preliminary finding that some of their products have failed to pass the formaldehyde test conducted by CARB. Lumber Liquidators must go farther to make sure that all of their laminate products comply with the standard and provide increased protection for the consumers.” GCM has asked Lumber Liquidators to disclose which products failed the CARB testing and by how much above the CARB formaldehyde standard. Lumber Liquidators’ laminate products have now failed to pass the CARB formaldehyde test conducted dozens of times by 60 Minutes, at least three independent laboratories, and apparently by CARB itself. While Lumber Liquidators continues to dispute the test method, the test method has been adopted, published and applied by CARB itself.

###

Global Community Monitor is a nonprofit environmental health and justice organization empowering communities to prevent their exposure to toxic chemicals and promote healthy outcomes for all. Global Community Monitor is joined in the Proposition 65 lawsuit by Sunshine Park, a firm affiliated with private investment companies that have substantial short financial exposure to Lumber Liquidators. Sunshine Park and its affiliates have financed extensive testing and have conducted substantial on-the-ground investigation regarding Chinese-made laminate flooring production.

GCM Announces New Testing Results of Lumber Liquidators Chinese‐made Laminates

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: March 2, 2015

CONTACT: Denny Larson, 415‐845‐4705; Michael Lozeau, 510‐836‐4200CONSUMERS CONTACT: Linda Dardarian, 800‐538‐1467

GCM Announces New Testing Results of Lumber Liquidators Chinese‐made Laminates

All Chinese‐made Laminates Purchased for Testing Failed CARB Standards

Why These Tests Matter

As noted in the 60 Minutes report, which aired on March 1, 2015, probably tens of thousands of households in California and probably hundreds of thousands of households nationwide are being exposed to formaldehyde emissions from Lumber Liquidators Chinese‐made laminate flooring(i).

According to its website, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) “evaluated formaldehyde exposure in California and found that one of the major sources of exposure is from inhalation of formaldehyde emitted from composite wood products containing urea‐formaldehyde resins. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) reclassified formaldehyde from “probably carcinogenic to humans” to “carcinogenic to humans” in 2004, based on the increased risk of nasopharyngeal cancer. Formaldehyde was also designated as a toxic air contaminant (TAC) in California in 1992 with no safe level of exposure. State law requires ARB to take action to reduce human exposure to all TACs.” (emphasis added).(ii)

The Standards

CARB’s emissions standards regulate the formaldehyde emissions from “composite wood products” such as particleboard, plywood, and medium density fiberboard (MDF). These composite wood products are used in finished goods such as laminate flooring, furniture, or shelving. The underlying particleboard, plywood, or MDF is sometimes referred to as the “core” of the finished good.

CARB’s emission standards make it unlawful to sell products, including laminate wood flooring, in California that contain composite wood cores that exceed certain formaldehyde levels set by CARB.

The Test Method & Results

The tests analyzed Lumber Liquidators laminate flooring purchased in California both in stores and online – the same flooring that consumers would purchase. Lumber Liquidators states that this laminate flooring complies with the CARB Phase 2 Formaldehyde standard. Three different laboratories conducted extensive testing on this flooring – these labs performed over 80 “deconstruction tests” (of which 76 were on Chinese‐made laminates) using the CARB‐approved finished goods methodology and over 200 other formaldehyde tests.

Every single U.S.‐made Lumber Liquidators laminate product purchased for testing passed the CARB standard. Every single Chinese‐made Lumber Liquidators laminate product purchased for testing failed the CARB standard – and by a large average margin. The average formaldehyde emissions of the Chinese‐made products tested was over 6x the CARB legal limit for the MDF core.

LLAvgFormEmissions

 

All Three Laboratories Used the CARB‐Approved Test Method

Each of the testing laboratories used the finished goods sample preparation method and test method developed by CARB and published on CARB’s website. This is the official CARB test method. CARB has only one published test method for testing for formaldehyde in finished products containing composite wood cores, and that is the test method the independent laboratories used.

The purpose of the deconstruction is to expose the composite wood core so that its emissions can be compared against CARB’s numeric limit. CARB has published a “Standard Operating Procedure” for finished goods testingiii. According to this SOP, this procedure “is to be used to prepare a finished good for laboratory testing to determine if the finished good complies with” CARB standards.(iv) Senior CARB personnel have confirmed that the SOP is the official CARB methodology for analyzing formaldehyde emissions from finished goods.

Lumber Liquidators has criticized the CARB test method, but that industry argument has long since been rejected by CARB. CARB’s official legislative history from 2007 states:

Yes it is correct that finished products must be deconstructed to test for compliance. But, we disagree that there is great uncertainty in the enforcement program. Deconstructive testing is needed for finished goods to verify compliance with the emission standards. We are currently developing the sample preparation and testing protocols that we will use to enforce the ATCM (see page 127 of the ISOR). The sample preparation and emission testing protocol we use to enforce the ATCM will be technically sound and will be more than adequate to identify non‐ compliant composite wood products found in finished goods for California.(v)

Although Lumber Liquidators says it has done testing, it does not say that it has performed deconstructive testing.

The company also posted a chart of “Fiberboard Core Testing” on its website. If these tests were performed by “Third Party Certifiers” (TPCs)vi in China, it would only indicate that the core manufacturer is capable of producing CARB‐compliant cores – not that the cores used in Lumber Liquidators’ products are actually CARB compliant. As noted by 60 Minutes, “[e]mployees at the mills openly admitted that they use core boards with higher levels of formaldehyde to make Lumber Liquidators laminates…they also admitted falsely labeling the company’s laminate flooring as CARB2”. In addition, TPCs sometimes conduct testing on pre‐scheduled dates (rather like announcing the location of highway “speed traps.”) Therefore, TPC tests do not, and cannot, prove that all of Lumber Liquidators’ Chinese‐made products sold in the United States comply with CARB standards. Lumber Liquidators has acknowledged as much in a public court filing:

“A [third‐party certification] is obtained from an approved, third‐party testing lab that tests samples of products – not every product – for formaldehyde levels. Thus, LL’s statement that it obtains [third‐party certifications] from its suppliers (mills) is in no way a representation that every single product meets CARB’s standards.”(vii)

###

Global Community Monitor is a nonprofit environmental health and justice organization empowering communities to prevent their exposure to toxic chemicals and promote healthy outcomes for all. Global Community Monitor is joined in the Proposition 65 lawsuit by Sunshine Park, a firm affiliated with private investment companies that have substantial short financial exposure to Lumber Liquidators. Sunshine Park and its affiliates have financed extensive testing and have conducted substantial on‐the‐ ground investigation regarding Chinese‐made laminate flooring production.


 

(i) Lumber Liquidators (LL) has stated that it had “over 620,000 customer transactions” in 2014 alone. LL also states that Laminate, Bamboo, Cork, and Vinyl Plank together accounted for 38% of net sales in 2014. In previous years, LL also disclosed that laminates were 22%, 23%, and 21% of net sales in 2012, 2011, and 2010, respectively. Source: Lumber Liquidators Holdings, Inc. SEC filings

(ii) See http://www.arb.ca.gov/toxics/compwood/compwood.htm
(iii) This SOP can be found in the “Test Methods” section of CARB’s website (http://www.arb.ca.gov/toxics/compwood/outreach/testmethods.htm)
(iv) See http://www.arb.ca.gov/toxics/compwood/outreach/compwood_sop_fg_decon_091313.pdf
v See http://www.arb.ca.gov/regact/2007/compwood07/fsorcompwood07.pdf [Agency Response [24‐Landry‐ 070423‐CWIC] (emphasis added).
(vi) CARB defines a Third Party Certifier as “an organization or entity approved by the Executive Officer that verifies the accuracy of the emission test procedures and facilities used by manufacturers to conduct formaldehyde emission tests, monitors manufacturer quality assurance programs, and provides independent audits and inspections.” See http://www.arb.ca.gov/toxics/compwood/certifiers.htm
(vii) See Donnie Williamson, et al., v Lumber Liquidators, Inc. Case #1:14‐00035‐GBL‐TCB. “Memorandum in Support of Defendant Lumber Liquidators, Inc.’s Motion to Dismiss Under Rules 12(b)(1) and 12(b)(6).” Emphasis in original

Thank you to everyone who watched 60 Minutes last night and supported us.  Today, our phone lines are ringing off of the hook and we’re doing our best to respond to all of the e-mails and messages.  We’ve updated our website with more information.

Global Community Monitor’s work to protect the public from health threats will be featured on 60 Minutes on Sunday March 1st.

60MinutesInterview

According to 60 Minutes’ own show notes:

After a seven-month investigation, 60 MINUTES found that Chinese-made laminate flooring sold in Lumber Liquidator outlets across the country contains amounts of toxic formaldehyde that may not meet health and safety standards.  Anderson Cooper reports.

In July 2014, Global Community Monitor released independent lab tests showing that Chinese-made laminate flooring sold by the Lumber Liquidators chain emits formaldehyde at levels far above the level requiring cancer warnings under California law.

Read more about the GCM’s work to protect public health.


Protect your family

If you live in California and have purchased laminate flooring from Lumber Liquidators in the past several years, you can find more information here.

Join the fight to protect our health

Make a gift to support GCM’s work to use legal means to protect public health.


 

 

 

~Save the Date~

60 Minutes Viewing Party

March 1, 2015 – 5pm – 8pm at the Ivy Room60 minutes invite

GCM is going to be on 60 Minutes and we’re all meeting up at the Ivy Room to watch it!  Pamela’s going to bring some salad and Denny’s making vegan chili & cornbread so BYO chili toppings and support our local watering hole by buying a cocktail from the bar.

Come join GCM Staff (we may even sign an autograph or two..) and learn more about the work we’re doing in California and worldwide to protect everyone from toxic exposure.

RSVP here

In case you missed it, some great activists are coming together in Oakland, CA this weekend to demand real leadership on climate change and strategize on how to achieve it.  The heavyweight (activist) contenders include 350.org, Californians Against Fracking, EarthJustice, Idle No More, and you know Global Community Monitor will be there!

Here’s why YOU need to be there:

  • Activists from all over the State are planning on attending.  This means you’ll have an opportunity to connect with the farmer in Kern County, concerned about groundwater contamination from fracking as well as the community leaders who are winning the fight in the Monterey Shale
  • There WILL be stickers!
  • By attending you’ll be able to learn about and contribute to statewide strategies to protect our communities for 2015

GrandLakeSign

  • Oakland’s a great city and the march should take you past the famous Grand Lake Farmers Market where you can pick up a quick snack and relish in the support from the Grand Lake Theater.
  • As always, the more of us show up, the louder the message is to Gov. Jerry Brown!

And, here’s the line-up:

  • Saturday, February 7th starts out with a march at 11:30am, meeting at Frank Ogawa Plaza.
  • Later that day, Californians Against Fracking (CAF) are hosting a statewide convergence at 4pm at Laney College.  Activists who are working to stop fracking in their communities will convene to hear more about CAF and to discuss how their local community or organization can engage with others across the state.
  • Sunday, February 8th, ForestEthics is closing out an amazing weekend with California’s first-ever statewide strategy summit on oil by rail from 9:30am – 4pm at Laney College.

No Fracking Billboard

 

gcm-logo

 

Whew, 2014 went by quickly and we were busy!

GCM’s 2014 PROJECT HIGHLIGHTS

GCM produced a landmark year, bringing long-term projects (2+ years) to a close in 2014.  Working in partnership with Coming Clean Collaborative and community partners to simultaneously release Warning Signs, a national report, and journal article on gas operations/fracking in late October. The report and article featured GCM’s monitoring work around gas operations in six states and provided a snapshot of the impacts of the industry throughout the country.

Southwest Organizing Project (SWOP) issued a statewide Air Quality Report, Breathe In New Mexico, featuring
Bucket Brigades in Albuquerque, Mesquite and the Navajo Reservation in November.

CommunityRecycleIn partnership with Center on Race, Poverty and the Environment and the Committee for A Better Arvin, we gathered a trail of evidence exposing the local compost facility’s poisoning of the local community. The publication, Rotten Neighbor: The Story of Community Recycling and Resource Recovery and the South Kern Communities Held Hostage by Neglect was released on the 3rd anniversary of two young workers’ deaths in October.

GCM also closed out the East Bay Body Burden Study in August.

GCM worked with partners to analyze monitoring data and release reports on the movement of goods including:

  • Argentine/Turner, Kansas: Focusing on a nearby rail yard, GCM and partners released a report that showed unhealthy levels of diesel exhaust, levels high enough on some days to send the elderly to the hospital or to raise the death rate among residents. The project was featured in a front-page story in the Kansas City Star.
  • Seward, Alaska: In July, the Resurrection Bay Conservation Alliance, Community Action Against Toxins and Global Community Monitor released the results of our collaborative air quality testing study. The report samples revealed that air around the Seward Coal Loading Facility expose neighbors to crystalline silica.
  • Houston, Texas: After closing out a year of sampling, we issued a report suggesting that every day the 10,000 residents of Galena Park are being exposed to unhealthy levels of particulate matter pollution from 5,000 diesel trucks entering and exiting Houston’s port.
  • Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana: Working with local residents, the Gulf Restoration Network and the Clean Gulf Commerce Coalition, GCM launched a coal export monitoring project in 2014.

GCM’s Long Term/In Depth Partnerships

Central Valley:

  • GCM has begun developing a model for improving the acceptance of community-based air monitoring and data into air district policy and decision making and enforcement of existing rules.
  • GCM’s Central Valley Organizer responded to complaints about gas odors in residents’ homes in Arvin, CA. Sample results revealed over twenty toxic chemicals, including cancer-causing benzene. The County evacuated eight homes. It was determined that fracking waste gas was beneath the homes. After months of advocating, Governor Jerry Brown intervened on behalf of the State. Flare in Shafter
  • We are completing a pilot one-year ozone monitoring program in Central Valley.  GCM obtained funding to purchase various new air sensors and field test an ultrafine particulate monitor

Bay Area:

  • Chevron’s real time Air Monitoring system in Richmond, CA went online with GCM serving as the City of Richmond’s expert advising the staff and ensuring accountability. This system is the best state-of-the-art refinery air-monitoring project in the nation and establishes a national model.
  • GCM has been participating in SF Bay Area Air Board meetings to advocate for the strongest Refinery Crude Slate and Tracking Rule in the nation. aimeecbrcrop
  • GCM provided guidance, planning and fundraising assistance to a newly formed Bay Area Refinery Corridor Coalition in the San Francisco Bay Area to help address crude by rail projects and refinery expansions.

2014 New Projects:

GCM launched two new air-monitoring collaborations with Jamaica Environment Trust in Clarendon & St. Anne
Parish, Jamaica and the Neighbors for Clean Air in Portland, OR.

cropped-cropped-Conf-Logo-4-web-banner-980x3501

GCM organized a national gathering, the Community-Based Science for Action Conference, in November in New Orleans. This three-day event was co-hosted by local partners, Louisiana Bucket Brigade and Public Lab.

The event included a toxic tour of coal trains and a coal terminal in Gretna and Ironton, LA. Over 50 people, primarily industrial occupation doctors and nurses associated with the American Public Health Association Conference, attended the tour.  The following two days brought together approximately 150 attendees participating in 20 sessions featuring presenters from leading organizations and academic institutions.  Feedback from presenters and attendees has been extremely positive and supportive.  GCM was able to offer 35 scholarships to community members and presenters.
In addition, we participated in the Rally Against Fracking in Sacramento and all four of the Healing Walks in the Bay Area, organized by Idle No More.

Students at Don't Frack CA Rally

We also participated in numerous conferences and finally got a GCM Advisory Board organized to work on:

  • Expanding GCM’s monitoring tool kit
  • Build a place to provide resources for communities (online forums, website)
  • Leverage & legitimize current methods
  • Data presentation
  • Alternatives to fossil fuels

So Happy New Year!  And let’s see what we can accomplish in 2015.

Now that the dust has settled, we all got some much needed rest and the final close out paperwork is just about finalized, here are the top ten highlights from the Community Based Science for Action Conference.

  1. New Orleans! 

What better city to host the Community Based Science for Action Conference!  GCM has an exciting project nearby in Plaquemines Parish and co-hosts Public Lab and the Louisiana Bucket Brigade both have offices there.  With great food, music and culture; it was never a dull moment.

2.   The Toxic Tour of Myrtle Grove and Woodpark

Going all of the way to New Orleans without visiting our project partners in Plaquemines Parish would have been a huge disservice to all in attendance.   These communities are living on the fenceline of a large coal export terminal and have been plagued with fine coal dust covering their homes, decks and backyards.  Many of the residents all shared a similar story of moving out to the Louisiana bayou for a peaceful retirement.  Now they’re golden years are filled with relentless Environmental Justice activism.  Hearing their stories being shared with fellow activists, community organizers and even some folks from the American Public Health Association’s annual meeting was no less than inspiring.

3.   Keynote Speakers, Hilton Kelley and Gen. Honore

           

Two Environmental Justice leaders lending inspirational stories of their own challenges and success, what a better way to kick off each day of the Conference!

4.   All of the great new monitoring tools & techniques! 

What happens when you bring a bunch of community scientist together?  Well, for starters, they bring all of their monitoring tools to demo!  We had Buckets, Mini Vols, FLIR cameras, Kites and a plethora of gadgets from the Public Lab community. This provided an amazing opportunity to learn about the pros and cons of each as well as learn which ones would work best in each individual community.  Community monitoring tools have come a long way and there’s still room for improvement.  We’re doing our best to make sure all of the presentations are available online, so if you missed it, check here to see if we’ve got it.

5.   Wendy Colonna

We’re building a movement here and all strong social movements need music.  Wendy kept us going!

 6.   The Hosts and Volunteers!

With the community based monitoring expertise of Global Community Monitor, the local knowledge of the Louisiana Bucket Brigade and the resourcefulness of Public Lab the Community Based Science for Action Conference was no less than amazing.  This was by far a powerhouse trio and without the support from all three organizations, the Conference just wouldn’t have been the same.  Similarly, without the help from our volunteers, we’d probably still be trying to set up the place.  Three cheers for the volunteers who kept that show running! 

7.   The Networking Opportunities

Where can a resident from San Antonio, Texas get more information about a community led fight against a diesel emitting railyard from the community member leading one in Kansas City?  Well, the Community Based Science for Action Conference helped to connect those folks.  This conference provided an invaluable opportunity for residents living on the fenceline of heavy industrial pollution to connect with one another and share their own experiences.  What can a fact sheet do for my community?  Do you know anyone at EPA Region 2?  Can you help me organize my community?  How the heck can I use social media for fundraising?  All of these conversations were facilitated by the Community Based Science for Action Conference and that’s pretty rad!

8.   The Venue and Accommodations

The Old U.S. Mint was perfectly located in New Orleans’ French Quarter, and who doesn’t need a beignets break in between sessions?  The layout worked well, the auditorium was perfect for large sessions and there was plenty of room for one on one conversations.  Similarly, the Hyatt was a great place to recharge at the end of the day.  The plush pillows, multiple restaurants and gathering places, AND that breakfast buffet was delicious!!

9.   Happy Hour at the Maison

Open bar, tasty New Orleans appetizers and live music? Yes, please!

10.   The Attendees!

Even the best of the best planned conferences mean nothing without a wide range of attendees.  The scholarship assistance ensured that no one was turned away for lack of funds, which is crucial in getting community leaders there.  This movement is going to take people power and by the looks of it, we’ve got a pretty phenomenal bunch.  If it weren’t for the attendees, us hosts would have gotten pretty lonely.  So, thanks for coming out, thanks for your support and thanks for sharing your expertise!

And if you haven’t seen our photos or filled out the feedback form, please check it out.

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